Apple’s A7 64-bit chip could mean universal, desktop-class apps on the iPad and iPhone

There is lots of analysis out on the web now about how important the 64-bit-ness of Apple’s new A7 chip (in the iPhone 5S). They all seem to be missing a big point: the A7’s power means all sorts of desktop application power can be used on iOS devices like the iPhone 5S, and the soon-to-be-announced iPad 5 (I imagine the iPad mini 2 will use a last-generation processor, such as the iPad 4’s A6X, to keep its price down).

Let’s take a look at Apple’s iWork suite (now free for new iOS device purchasers, by the way) for an example of what the future might look like for OS X and iOS apps.

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Is Apple adding a database to its iWork suite of office tools?

Curious timing here. Apple already announced the iPhone 5S and 5C, and rumors are they will announce a new iPad and iPad mini next month. Apple also announced the iWork (Pages, Keynote, and Numbers) suite of apps will be free for every iOS device sold.

Also coming soon is Mac OS X Mavericks and new Macs. Will iWork be free for them, also?

If so, does iWork need a database? Apple subsidiary FileMaker already made a very nice and consumer-friendly database for iOS and OS X called Bento. (Note: it was not in any way enterprise-worthy, and could not hold a candle to Microsoft Access, even.)

Curiously, Bento is being discontinued at the end of September, right before Apple’s next major iPad and Mac announcements. Are these events linked? Or is it just coincidence?

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