federighi_hero20120727

Apple has hugely ambitious plans for open-sourced Swift, and hints on what’s coming to iOS

Craig Federighi revealed many interesting tidbits when you read the transcript–and read between the lines–of his talk with John Gruber of Daring Fireball on The Talk Show podcast.

First let me tie this into yesterday’s post by talking about the maturation of iOS by bringing in features from OS X, and then I’ll talk about the hugely ambitious plans to take Swift Everywhere.

Continue reading

Standard

Is OS X becoming ‘Legacy’?

You might have missed the fact that Apple’s iPad Pro is about 50% faster than the new Retina MacBook. That’s right, Apple’s ARM chip running iOS is faster–for the same price point–as an Intel chip running on OS X.

As Apple’s mobile devices–powered by their AX series of processors–become more powerful, the inevitable question comes up: Whither OS X and Intel?

I’ve long wondered whether OS X would be ported to the ARM architecture to work on a MacBook-like device that used an Apple A10 chip (or maybe a new B-series).

The other possibility, of course, is that the opposite happens: instead of OS X coming to ARM, iOS (already on ARM) would gain a mouse-and-keyboard interface. And, just as watchOS and tvOS were created to handle the Crown and Siri Remote, there would be a new AppleOS or mouseOS or macOS that would be based on iOS but have a different user interaction mechanism.

I used to be on the fence about which option Apple could take, and thought it was a 50:50 probability as to whether OS X would be ported to ARM or whether iOS would gain mouse-and-keyboard functionality.
But a while back, Benedict Evans, a VC analyst at Andreesen-Horowitz, tweeted this:

“Apple has replaced operating systems before. iOS will replace OS X in due course too. Modern versus legacy.”

https://twitter.com/benedictevans/status/649392166351953920 

And ever since then, I’ve come more and more into his camp, thinking he’s absolutely right. Let me explain why.

Continue reading

Standard
charge_large

Apple Accessory Design: It’s not just Beauty

So there’s been much wailing and gnashing of teeth lately about the design of some of Apple’s accessories. This includes the new Magic Mouse 2 with the charging port on the bottom, the iPad Pro with the Pencil sticking out of it, and the iPhone 6s battery pack.

People need to remember that great design in not just about making something look good. It’s about making it work well.

As I said in the last couple of posts about the iPad Pro’s keyboard, great design is all about compromise, and Apple does that exceptionally well.

Today, let’s look at the iPad Pro’s Pencil accessory, and look at what the hubbub is all about.

Continue reading

Standard
IMG_2131 iPad Pro Carry 1

But wait, there’s more: Another great design element of Apple’s iPad Pro Keyboard

There’s been a lot of chatter on the web about recent Apple design decisions, such as the iPhone 6 battery case and the iPad Pro’s keyboard. Yesterday, I talked about how the iPad Pro’s keyboard was designed specifically for a touchscreen device, and the compromises that entailed.

Today, I want to talk briefly about another design element of the iPad Pro’s keyboard cover (Smart Keyboard) that’s often overlooked.

Continue reading

Standard
IMG_2133 iPad Pro Finger Reach Angled

Compromise: How Apple designed the best keyboard cover for iPad Pro

Microsoft famously claimed that the Surface Pro was a “no-compromise” device—the best of both a tablet and laptop. John Gruber of Daring Fireball famously pointed to reviews calling that claim into question. It was a touchscreen tablet with a full laptop keyboard.

So it was not surprising that reviewers and people on Twitter complained bitterly about the iPad Pro’s Smart Keyboard, and how un-laptop-like it was.

IMG_2130 iPad Pro Top

So I did a little research, and in this post I’ll explain my thoughts with photos to back them up.

Continue reading

Standard
smart_keyboard_large

Where are Apple’s iPad Pro Apps for Pros?

Apple just announced that iPad Pro is available for ordering Wednesday. I think it’s going to be a huge success, but I am a little concerned about one thing: Where are Apple’s pro apps?

Now I fully understand that the iPad Pro is, in many ways, “just another iPad” and thus will not likely have any apps that only run on the iPad Pro. And I understand that Apple wants to encourage third party developers to create apps of their own.

But for it to be successful, it certainly needs apps that take advantage of its hallmark features for professionals, such as Pencil and its new keyboard cover (a first for iPads and, I predict, will not be shared with smaller iPads).

But is Apple going to leave the pro apps to third parties like Microsoft and Adobe?

Continue reading

Standard